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How to Care for a Fiddle Leaf Fig

Laura from Garden Answer shares her tips for caring for Fiddle Leaf Figs. This “it” plant is loved by designers and decorators for it’s large, violin-shaped leaves. Give fiddle leaf figs everything they need to continue growing healthy and strong year-round.

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Spring Houseplant Care Tips

After months spent overwintering or dormant, your houseplants are ready to welcome spring with open arms and begin their active growing period. Houseplants are easy to care for but they still need some TLC.

The warmer weather calls for some extra attention! Gear up for repotting, feeding, sunning and scheduling.

Make a happy home for plants with the following tips. Here’s how you do it!

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Four Tips for Spring Houseplant Care

  1. Rehome and Repot: When repotting plants, we recommend using a new container that’s a little bigger than your plant’s current home. If you choose to use a previously used container, clean it with soap and water first to rid of any diseases or houseplant pests that could be hiding inside. Once your container is ready, fill it about halfway with Espoma’s potting mix or appropriate soil for your plant type. If any of the roots have grown tightly bound in a circular pattern, gently loosen them to stimulate new growth. Then, place the plant in the center of the new pot and fill with soil to within 1-3” of the rim. Water well and allow the soil to settle. Add more potting soil if necessary.
  2. Give Houseplants a Spring feeding: There’s no doubt that your plants are hungry after a long winter nap! Feed bi-weekly with Espoma’s indoor liquid houseplant food. This gives plants the natural proteins and beneficial microbes they need to provide beautiful results.
  3. Bring Plants Outside: Give plants some fresh air once in a while. As it warms up, set your plants outside during the day to soak up some rays. When the temperatures begin to drop in the evening, it’s time to bring them back inside.
  4. Create a schedule: Houseplants thrive with regular care. Add water if the soil is dry to the touch. But be careful not to water too much or too frequently. Overwatering is the number one cause of houseplant death. So if the is not dry to the touch, check it again in a few days. In order to protect your plants from not getting the right about of water, create a schedule of watering times and days to help you remember when your plants need your attention.

Plants need water, light and nutrients to thrive indoors. So, determine what kind of houseplant you have and it’s specific needs. With the proper care, your plant will let you know it’s happy by maintaining healthy leaves.

Ready to learn more? Find out how to Make a Happy Home for Plants!

Three signs your orchid needs to be repotted

Orchids make the perfect houseplants — they’re stylish, long-lasting and easy to care for. They’ll continue to bloom for years with minimal effort.

After years of living in the same space, things might get cramped. And the same can be said for your moth orchid. Refresh your orchid – and let it spread its roots – by giving it a new home and repotting it.

Orchids generally need to be repotted once a year. The best time to repot is just after flowering, or when new growth appears.

You’ll know it’s time to repot if any of these reasons apply to you:

  1. Your orchid has tightly tangled roots. It’s normal for Phalaenopsis orchids to have loosely tangled roots. This is a surefire sign your orchid needs to be repotted. Give plants breathing room by placing it in a larger pot every year or two with fresh potting soil.
  2. It’s been a while since you’ve repotted. Orchids need fresh potting mix every year or so.
    This continues to provide plants with the best nutrients and encourages proper air circulation. Soil that is not replaced can retain more water, leading to root rot and leaving your orchid vulnerable to fungal diseases.
  3. Your orchid’s roots are soft and brown. If you truly waited too long to repot, you’ll notice that your orchid is holding too much water. The roots will appear brown and feel soft to the touch. Fresh orchid potting mix will provide your plant with the environment it needs to stay happy and healthy.

Think it’s time to repot? Follow the steps below to give your orchid the space and soil it needs to keep growing happy and healthy.

How to repot orchids:

  1. Choose the right medium. We suggest using Espoma Organic Orchid Mix. For best results, pre-soak orchid mix for 24 hours and allow water to drain.
  2. Remove orchid from current container and trim dead roots from the plant.
  3. Fill container to one third full with orchid mix.
  4. Position single stem plants in the center of the new pot. Position multi-stem plants against the pot wall. Staking may be required until the plants are fully established.
  5. Gently cover roots with additional mix and fill pot to 1/2 inch below rim.
  6. Water thoroughly. Add more mix if setting occurs.

 Is your orchid telling you it needs to be repotted? Watch this video to learn how!

Five Ways to Celebrate Houseplant Appreciation Day

The winter season can seem to drag on forever with its harsh weather, short days and dreary landscapes. Which means now is the perfect time to bring the memory of the warm spring weather indoors with houseplants.

January 10 is Houseplant Appreciation Day, and there’s no better way to celebrate than to acknowledge all the things they do for you. They’re decorative, boost well-being and purify indoor air.

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Here are 5 simple tips to celebrate the day:

  1. Recognize houseplants for all they do

Many houseplants do double duty by looking good and cleaning the air, absorbing up to 87 percent of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that hide in ordinary household products such as paints, carpets and ink. Studies from the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) have found that levels of indoor air pollution can be two to five times higher — and in some cases 10 times more polluted than outdoor air.

  1. Add a Plant

You can never have too many houseplants, right? According to the EPA, most people spend 90 percent of their time indoors; a houseplant is the perfect way to be reminded of the beauty the world has to offer outside. Houseplants bring a breath of fresh air to a room when placed in colorful pots and made into a focal point. Succulents, orchids and African violets all make good additions.

  1. Learn how to care for your plant

Plants need water, light and nutrients to thrive indoors. Step one; determine what kind of houseplant you have. This can be as simple as checking the plant tag. Your plant will let you know it’s happy by maintaining healthy leaves.

  1. Create a schedule

Houseplants do best with regular care, trust us. Now is the time to create a watering schedule if you don’t already have one. Add water if the soil is dry about an inch below the surface. Overwatering is the number one cause of houseplant death. So if the plant does not seem too dry, check it again in a few days.

  1. Feed them

Fertilizing is easy with Espoma’s indoor liquid plant foods. Give plants the natural proteins and beneficial microbes they need to provide beautiful results.

Show gratitude for your favorite plants by giving them proper care. Learn how here.

A Healthy and Happy New Year with Plants

With the start of a new year, we’ve got resolutions on our mind. Eat right, exercise more and add houseplants.

Yep, you read that right. Houseplants actually boost your wellbeing. In addition to bringing the outdoors in, some houseplants are proven to provide both physical and psychological benefits.

You know that plants produce the oxygen we breathe, but did you know that houseplants are also powerful natural air filters. Common products such as household cleaners, carpets, furniture and nail polish release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

Add just few plants to your home to improve air quality. Adding houseplants is one of the easiest and least expensive ways to make your home healthier for the New Year.

Winter houseplants aren’t just limited to holiday plants like poinsettias. The options are endless.

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The Best Plants for Your Home

  • African violets
  • Orchids
  • Peace lily
  • Chinese evergreen
  • Philodendron
  • ZZ plant
  • Dieffenbachia

he colorful blooms of African violets are extra special. They’ll instantly add color to any room.

Some houseplants even remove common toxins from indoor air, surely shooing away the winter blues.

Other scientific studies show houseplants can help us stay healthier in other ways, including reducing frequency of headaches, sore throats and stress levels.

Especially after spending so much time indoors for the winter, it’s nice to have a pop of nature. Dry skin and chapped lips are uncomfortable side effects of forced-air heating. A natural remedy is to add houseplants that act as humidifiers, releasing moisture as a part of their natural breathing.

Being around plants, especially in indoor environments, improves creativity, problem-solving skills, memory, and cognitive skills.

While you’re at it, don’t forget to keep houseplants healthy! The cold season can be challenging for houseplants, too. Help houseplants thrive by creating a happy home and they’ll continue brightening winter days. Feed with Espoma’s indoor liquid plant foods to give plants the natural proteins and beneficial microbes they need. And the innovative Easy Dose cap pours the perfect amount without any measuring or mess.

Houseplants give back year-round. Learn more about caring for houseplants here.

Help Houseplants Weather the Winter

Lush green plants filled with blooms aren’t only found in the garden. Even though you’ve put your outdoor garden to bed for the winter, you can still grow thriving houseplants inside.

Winter houseplants aren’t just limited to holiday plants like poinsettias. The options are endless — ranging from African violets to orchids. Some houseplants even remove common toxins from indoor air, surely shooing away the winter blues.

The cold season can be challenging for houseplants, however. Light is low, days are short and indoor humidity is terrible. Help houseplants thrive by creating a happy home and they’ll continue brightening winter days.

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Four tips to help houseplants thrive over winter:

  1. Keep leaves green. If leaf tips are brown, it means your houseplant isn’t getting enough moisture. The remedy is simple. Place a humidifier near multiple plants or place the plant on a tray of pebbles and water. But don’t let the roots sit in standing water.
  2. Don’t forget to water. This is a common issue for the forgetful gardener. Set up a watering schedule and give plants a drink when soil is dry to the touch, about every seven to 10 days.
  3. Let in the light. A houseplant will tell you it’s happy by maintaining healthy leaves. If there’s enough light for you to read by, there’s probably enough for a low-light houseplant. Don’t put plants near heat or air conditioning ducts, on TVs, or between curtains and chilly windows.
  4. Feed Organically. Fertilizing is easy with Espoma’s indoor liquid plant foods. Give plants the natural proteins and beneficial microbes they need to provide beautiful results. And the innovative Easy Dose cap pours the perfect amount without any measuring or mess.

Brown thumbs can easily turn green. Learn more about caring for houseplants here.

Top 4 Houseplants to Give and Get this Holiday Season

There’s so much to love about the holiday season — the cooking and baking, the time spent with family and friends, and the festive plants. Poinsettias or a blooming Christmas cactus are compact yet boast of holiday spirit. The more plants, the merrier!

With just a little care, holiday houseplants can continue to thrive throughout the year. Knowing how to care for them helps to keep them beautiful. Repot later if needed.

So whether you’re getting or giving holiday houseplants, use these tips to help keep them blooming.

How to Care for Holiday Favorites

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Poinsettia: No other plant quite marks the beginning of the holiday season like the poinsettia. With more than 100 varieties available today in colors of red, white, pink and more, this plant can be found just about everywhere during the holidays.

First things first, don’t let poinsettias get cold on the ride home from the store. Keep trips and exposure to cold as short as possible. Once home, these cheery plants thrive on six hours of indirect light a day away from cold drafts and need proper watering. When the plant needs water, remove the decorative foil and let soak in a few inches of water for an hour or so. Let excess drain and rewrap.

Tip: Take the poinsettia out of its foil and place it in a decorative container.

Norfolk Island pine: A mini Christmas tree, this festive plant looks lovely when adorned with mini lights and homemade ornaments or just plain on its own.

Give pines about six to eight hours of light per day. Any less and lower branches are likely to drop. Water when dry to the touch. Fertilize Norfolk Island pines bi-monthly with our new liquid houseplant fertilizer to keep them happy and healthy.

Tip: Pines can last for years and be decorated for other seasons as well!

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Christmas cactus: Though this cactus is known for blooming around Christmas, it’ll stay strong throughout the year and periodically rebloom. It’s ruffled flowers range in color from reds to pinks to oranges and creams.

Give this plant bright indirect light and place outdoors in a semi-shady spot during summer months. Allow plant to become slightly dry between waterings.  Keeps this holiday plant reblooming for years to come by giving it a rest during the fall and placining it in the dark for about six to eight weeks, encouraging new blooms.

Tip: No matter how diligent you are about care, bloom time may vary based on variety. Whether or not it blooms in time for the holidays, you’ll still have winter blooms to enjoy.

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Cyclamen: Cyclamen’s bright flowers in pink, white or red are great for adding a pop of color where you need it. With the right conditions, they can bloom for more than eight weeks.

Cyclamen likes light, but not super-bright light. Keep the temperature consistent and deadhead spent flowers and leaves. Pour water in a saucer and let the plant absorb it for 15 to 20 minutes.

Tip: During the summer, cyclamen’s foliage turns yellow and dies back. This is their dormant period when they’re storing energy for the next flowering season.

Any houseplant can grow with the proper care. Learn how here.

Five Reasons to be Thankful for Houseplants

While you’re counting your blessings and listing those things you’re grateful for this Thanksgiving, don’t forget to include houseplants. Indoor plants provide a pop of color and interesting texture to any space.

Houseplants are more than just a pretty face, though. They impact our everyday lives by cleaning the air and reducing stress. Give houseplants everything they need to grow and they’ll pay you back.

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Here are the Top Five Reasons to Be Thankful for Houseplants

1. Indoor Plants Purify the Air

Studies from the US Environmental Protection Agency have found that levels of indoor air pollution can be two to five times higher — and in some cases 10 times more polluted — than outdoor air. Houseplants such as bromeliads, spider plants and dracaena, remove the harmful compounds frequently found in homes and offices, produced by cleaning supplies, paint, furniture glue and nail polish remover.

2. Houseplants help us relax

Researchers have found that being around plants—especially indoors, can reduce stress and help us feel happier and more relaxed. You can never have too many houseplants so choose one, or 10 that work for you.

3. Plants Make Us Smarter

Having a plant around can enhance learning abilities by improving our concentration, focus and problem-solving skills. Make sure to place houseplant in home offices, studying spaces and at work.

4. They Improve Our Physical Health

Plants offer physical benefits, too. One study found that adding plants to office spaces reduces headaches, coughs and sore throats. And employees typically use fewer sick days.

Know someone in the hospital? Bring them a plant. A Kansas State University studied found that patients in rooms with plants request less pain medication, have lower heart rates and blood pressure, experience less fatigue and anxiety and are discharged sooner.

5. They’re easy to care for

Seniors feel better and more fulfilled when they take care of houseplants (or pets). Keeping plants healthy, helps make us more socially connected and happy. There’s a perfect plant out there for anyone, and certain plants, such as sansevieria and zz plant, are surprisingly low maintenance .

Show gratitude for your favorite plants by giving them proper care. Learn how here.

A Plant Today Keeps the Doctor Away

For most of us, the outdoor gardening season is winding down. Yet, we want to keep that green thumb moving!

Channel your gardening energy indoors. A green-filled oasis awaits you! Add a few indoor plants today!

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Top 3 Reasons Why You Can Never Have Enough Houseplants

Plants add a pop of color and a burst of life to spaces. But, they do even more.

  1. Pollution Solution. Indoor plants scrub the air clean by removing toxins, according to NASA research. Houseplants remove 87 percent of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are in everything from rugs and grocery bags to paint and vinyl.
  2. Find Your Focus. Houseplants increase well-being by 47 percent, increase creativity by 45 percent and increase productivity by 38 percent, according to new research.
  3. Combat Colds. Powerful indoor plants can reduce fatigue, coughs, sore throats and other cold-related illnesses by more than 30 percent, found the University of Agriculture in Norway.

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Caring for Houseplants is Easy

Houseplants provide us with all those benefits and ask for very little in return. Here’s all they need!

  1. Strong Soil. Organic potting soil packed with nutrients, enriched with Myco-tone® and fortified with worm castings sets houseplants up for success. Whether you’re planting new or repotting old plants, use an organic soil.
  2. Light It Right. Check your plant tag to see how much sun your plant needs.
  3. Wow with Water. Water most houseplants when the top of the soil feels dry. Only water succulents and cacti when the soil is completely dry.
  4. Fuel with Organic Fertilizer. Add an organic indoor plant fertilizer when planting new houseplants. Fertilize houseplants with an organic fertilizer such as Gro-tone during active periods of growth. This is usually during the spring and summer.

Those happy houseplants will make you smile every day! Check out Espoma’s “Houseplant” Pinterest board for more inspiration and ideas!

Plant African Violets for a Pop of Color

Plant an African Violet in 9 Easy Steps:

Growing African violets is an easy way to add a burst of color inside – even in the dead of winter. These small flowers pack a punch with their bold color and dark, thick leaves.

To keep your African violet blooming all year long, follow these tips.

How to Pick, Plant and Care for African Violets:

  1. Pick the perfect plant. Select a healthy African violet in your choice of color that has dark green, spot-free leaves. Look for a plant with one growing center, known as a single crown, to get the most blooms.
  2. Start strong. Choose an organic potting soil made specifically for African violets, such as Espoma Organic African Violet Mix. A specially-formulated organic soil gives violets the right amount of air and drainage and is safe for people and pets, too.
  3. Choose a container. Use a pot made for azaleas or African violets, which has the right amount of drainage holes and a deep saucer. Avoid deep pots, which can cause roots to rot.
  4. Plant magic. Gently remove the African violet from its current pot without damaging roots. Next, give roots enough room to spread out. Pack any remaining holes with soil.
  5. Home sweet home. Place your African violet in a room-temperature spot with lots of indirect, natural light. Avoid direct sunlight, which can burn leaves. Be sure to rotate once a week for even growth.
  6. Water right. Only water your violet when the soil is dry to the touch. Then, fill the pot’s saucer, and allow the roots absorb the amount of water they need. After an hour, dump any remaining water to avoid over watering.
  7. Feed weekly. To keep your violet blooming and healthy, feed once a week with an organic plant food such as Espoma Gro-tone. This applies to all houseplants, too!
  8. Stop suckers. If you spot new growth, called suckers, on the main stem of your flower, remove them. Suckers can lead to misshapen plants.
  9. Repot. Repot large African violets once to twice a year and smaller ones twice per year. Choose a new pot that is 1/3 the diameter of the plant.

Enjoy the beautiful colors of your new African violets! Then, share your experience or why you love this purple flower today.