Free Plants – Grow Pothos Cuttings in Water

With its attractive leaves and low maintenance personality, pothos is one of the best houseplants for new plant parents to grow. Those with trailing vines, like golden pothos, love to fall over the sides of containers. It’s a fun plant to decorate with and a favorite of brown thumb gardeners because it likes low light and minimal watering.

This is also one of the easiest plants to start propagating by cuttings. DIYers will love this trick for getting more pothos plants for free. If your pothos is getting a little leggy or you’re just looking for more plants, start with pothos.

6 Steps to Propagating Pothos

Step 1: Decide how much you want to cut from your plant. Make snips directly below the lowest leaf node. Nodes are those tiny brown bumps on the stem that are the key to growing new roots.

Step 2: Make more cuttings. You’ll need a stem with at least two leaves to root your plant and you’ll want to remove the leaf that is closest to the stem. So clip vines into more cuttings, leaving at least one node on each. Your new roots will form from the node.

Step 3: Place Cuttings in Water: Fill a small mason jar or other glass with water and place the cuttings into the water so the cut ends remain submerged. Place the cuttings indoors near a window, but not in direct sunlight. Check cuttings every few days and refresh water every 1 to 2 weeks.

Step 4: Wait until your cuttings have at least one inch of roots to transplant. This should take about a month. If left in water, your pothos plant will continue to grow roots. The longer they grow in water, however, the harder it will be for them to transition to soil.

Step 5: Pick a container with proper drainage holes and fill two-thirds of the way with Espoma’s Organic potting mix. Place the cuttings around the pot edges and add more soil to keep the cuttings in place. Add more cuttings to the middle and add soil as needed. Water your new pothos plant until water runs out of the bottom of the pot.

Step 6: Place your new pothos in an area where it will get adequate light. Fertilize once a month with Espoma’s Indoor! liquid plant food for more growth.

Looking for more easy care houseplants? Check out Garden Answer’s favorite low light houseplants!

Where to Buy

Organic Potting Mix

Indoor!

Fern Care Guide

We all love ferns, they are a classic houseplant. Ferns come in all kinds of sizes, textures and colors. Yet as far as plants go, they can be fussy. Laura from Garden Answer has the scoop.

If your fern is happy and healthy, great job! You can probably skip some of the topics toward the end.

Now let’s take a look at your fern and double check it is living its best life.

Here are 10 things to keep in mind as you tend to your fern:

Light Exposure

Contrary to popular belief, ferns need quite a bit of light. Though, they don’t like to be in direct sunlight as their foliage will change to a lighter yellow color or burn. Keep them near a place that receives plenty of sunshine throughout the day.

Only few varieties can handle shade and moisture like most people think. Check your plant tag for the most accurate information for your fern.

Temperature

Ferns like their surroundings to be similar to what we like between 65 and 75°F, matching the temperatures in our home. They don’t like it too drafty so keep them away from doors that lead outside and away from air vents.

Humidity

This is the most important thing to be aware of for keeping your fern healthy, especially if you live in a dry climate. Placing your fern in a bathroom or kitchen near the water source can help, since they typically get more moisture in there naturally.

For a more decorative option, place pebbles in tray with some water and place your fern on top. The moisture will carry up to the foliage as it evaporates. Add water to the tray as needed.

Soil Type

Use Espoma’s Organic Potting Mix for your ferns. Organic potting mixes have the right kind of drainage, and will hold just enough water that is needed without drowning your fern.

Repotting

Typically, ferns need to be repotted every two years. Check its roots once a year. If the roots are starting to circle around the container, it is time to repot. If there is still soil around the edge of it, it should be fine for another year.

When it is time to repot your fern, only go up one size for your container. Be sure there is a drainage hole at the bottom of your container. Place a small layer of Espoma’s Organic Potting Mix in the bottom and fill around the sides as needed.

Watering

Ferns like to be consistently damp, but not wet and soggy like many people think. Each fern and home is a bit different, especially this time of year. Water your fern and keep an eye on it. If the soil at the top feels dry, water it again.

Fertilizing

Ferns like to be fed about once a month during their growing season. Each zone and climate will have a different growing season, which you can ask your local garden center about. Feed your fern with Espoma’s Organic’s Indoor! liquid plant food. Check the label for instructions on how to use.

Grooming

All houseplants should be groomed about once a month. Remove any foliage that looks damaged, unhealthy or is turning brown or yellow. Discard any leaves or debris that is  on top of the soil to keep insects and disease at bay.

Insects

The most common insects to watch out for are mealybugs, aphids, fungus mites, white fly and spider mites for just about any houseplant. If you are unsure of the insect you are dealing with, take a picture and take it to your local garden center. They will be able to offer suggestions on how to get rid of it.

Toxicity

Ferns are non-toxic, but it is still a smart idea to keep your pets and kids away from eating or playing with a fern. That might just cause a tummy ache or a mess in your home!

Drop any other questions below in the comments and we will help you out the best we can!

 

Your Plants are Trying to Tell You Something

Did you know houseplants can communicate? We talk to our house plants in hopes they can tell us what’s wrong. Thankfully, plants communicate with us all the time. If your plants’ leaves are wilting, they’re saying “Please water me.” Yellow leaves are saying “Hold off on the water. You’re killing me with kindness.” Let’s look at a few things your plants are trying to tell you.

Leaf and Flower Drop

No one likes stress, not even plants. A common sign your plant is stressed is if it’s dropping leaves and flowers. Stressors can include lack of water, over watering, temperature change, less light – you name it. If the problem isn’t too little or too much water, or something else easy to identify, have patience. The plant will likely adapt to its new situation.

Wilting

Wilting is usually a sign that your plant needs water. Some plants, like peace lilies, wilt so terribly you’d think it was dead. But don’t worry, it’s just being dramatic and will perk up after a good watering.

Stretching

We’re not talking about yoga here. In the plant world that means long and spindly stems. The plants are literally stretching themselves toward the light. Sometimes older leaves will fall off. Check on your plants requirements — chances are it just needs more light. It could also mean that your plant needs pinching. It’s not mean, it’s kind of like pruning. Pinching off the top inch of your plant’s stem will encourage it to grow laterally and become fuller and more beautiful. Pinching off spent flowers is a good idea that will help your plant save energy, too.

Salt Build Up

Have you noticed some white stuff on the side of your clay pots? As you water and fertilize your plants, salts and other minerals can build up. It may cause the foliage tips to turn yellow or brown. Watering your plants in the sink and allowing the water to run through a few a few times helps flush then out. You can use a scrubbing pad on the outside of the pot. Repot regularly.

Brown Leaf Tips

Leaves get brown tips because water isn’t reaching that far. Too little water or too much fertilizer is usually to blame. Make sure you’re watering consistently. Use Espoma’s Indoor! House Plant Food for its slow release formula to ensure your plant isn’t being overfed. Always follow the package directions as more is not better. Do you remember the last time you repotted it? If you can’t, maybe it’s time for fresh soil and bigger pot.

Think your houseplants need some extra space? Check out this video about repotting house plants.

Where to Buy

Products for Healthy Houseplants

Indoor Liquid

Potting Mix

Houseplants that bloom – 5 orchids that put on a show

Orchids are the perfect way to introduce a stunning houseplant into your home. They bloom for up to four months, which make them the perfect plant to add some color and flair to any home. They love indirect light, a little bit of water and to be away from any drafty windows, air vents or ducts.

Plus, they will continue to rebloom every year with a little love and patience and fertilizer.

An organic fertilizer, such as Espoma’s Orchid! liquid plant food, will help keep your blooms looking fresh and colorful year after year.

There is a HUGE variety to choose from, all in different sizes, colors and fragrances so you can find one that you absolutely love.

Not sure where to start? Don’t worry; we’ve collected our favorite show stopping orchids for you.

 

Five Orchids That Put on a Show

Pansy Orchid

This flat-faced flower is one of the friendliest looking orchids you can choose. They bloom early in the spring and, in some varieties, will bloom again in the fall. Producing up to 10 flowers, each growing 4 inches across, this orchid will provide a stunning display. Mist weekly with water to give it the moisture it needs.

Sharry Baby Orchid

Growing best in filtered light, this orchid has small, but striking chocolate-colored petals. Unlike typical orchids, its flowering stalks will reach lengths up to four feet. Fertilizing regularly will encourage growth. Mist it lightly once a week to keep moderate humidity.

Image courtesy of Costa Farms

Moth Orchid

Its blooms look like butterflies and it’ll look great individually, but is stunning en masse. Gather a few different colors and textures and have every houseguest talking. They love bright, indirect sunlight, so near a window with a sheer curtain would make them happiest.

Lady’s Slipper Orchid

Coming in dozens of varieties, you can really play around with color combinations. Small enough to place anywhere in the home, we even recommend placing one a bathroom sink. It is beautiful from all angles, so mirrors can be beneficial. Plus, it enjoys low light with lots of humidity. After watering, be sure you allow it to drain completely.

Cattleya Orchid

This orchid thrives off a barky soil, so be sure to use Espoma Organic’s Orchid Mix, as it will wilt in regular potting soil. It is a light lover, so keep it near a window, but out of direct sun. It is happy in the same temperature as your home, around 65-75 degrees.

 

Laura from Garden Answer shows us the basics of caring for orchids.

 

 

 

Products for Happy Orchids:

Espoma Organic Orchid Mix

 

Why Philodendron is the Best Trailing Plant for Your Indoor Jungle and 4 Others We Love Too

Philodendron are one of the most popular, versatile, and easy to grow houseplants on the planet. Trailing plants lend an air of the tropical to your indoor jungle. They drape casually down from bookshelves and windowsills, looking graceful with their heart-shaped leaves. They’re absolutely ideal for hanging baskets. It is often said they thrive on neglect and that is not far from the truth.  There are over 200 different varieties, some with split-leaf foliage, some with variegation but all are perfect for even novice plant parents.

Image courtesy of Costa Farms

Light

Philodendron can survive with very little light but will grow faster and healthier in bright indirect light. They will sunburn in harsh, direct sunlight.

Water

Your container should have good drainage. Water when the top 50 percent of the soil is dry, about once a week. If the foliage begins to turn yellow, it’s an indication of too much water. Conversely, if the leaves turn brown, your plant needs more water.

Temperature and Humidity

Philodendron grow well in normal household temperatures, between 70°-80ºF during the day and above 55º F at night. Average home humidity levels are fine but an occasional misting or rinsing off the leaves would be welcome and remove dust.

Pests and Diseases

Over-watering can cause root-rot but yellow leaves will warn you to slow down the watering. While they are rarely bothered by pests, it’s a good idea to keep a look out for aphids and mites. If you do see them, try  Insect Soap.

Repotting and Fertilizing

Always use a quality soil like Espoma Organic Potting Mix for optimum plant health. Repot once a year.  Feed your plants once a month in spring and summer and, once every other month in fall and winter with an organic indoor plant food.

Endorsed By NASA

NASA lists a Heartleaf Philodendron as a clean air plant that removes formaldehyde, a chemical found in insulation, floor coverings, cleaning agents, pressed wood, and even paper towels, from the air.

More Super Star Vines

String of Pearls 

Looks exactly like its name. This succulent tolerates drought and does best in bright light.

Photo courtesy of Costa Farms

Pothos

Long, leafy vine that prefers bright, indirect light and moist soil. Will grow fairly well in low light too.

 

Inch Plant or Purple Heart

Beautiful purple foliage on trailing stems with attractive zebra patterned foliage. Perfect for hanging baskets.

Image courtesy of Costa Farms

Arrowhead Plant

Elegant plant that vines with age, prefers bright light and moderate watering.

Thinking about more indoor plants? Check out this video on the top low-light plants!

 

Espoma Products for Happy Trailing Plants:

 

Succulent Pot in a Pot – Quick Version

Social media is blowing up with a new trend – the Succulent Pot in a Pot. It is a fun way to make a succulent arrangement that is a little out of the norm.

 

Basically, it is creating a potted succulent “floral” arrangement inside another pot. You use a small container for the base of your arrangement and place it on its side in the larger container. You fill in the area above the small pot with succulents so, when you look down into the larger pot, you’ll see a beautiful “floral” arrangement made out of succulents.

It might seem a bit complicated in the explanation, but this project is simple, fun and adorable to look at all year long.

Step 1 – Fill Your Large Container

Grab a container that has proper drainage as succulents don’t like to be in too much water. Use an aerating soil, like Espoma’s Organic Cactus Mix to fill your container one inch from the brim. This will allow room for you to sink in the smaller container and plant your succulents.

Step 2 – Lay in Your Small Container

Gently sink your smaller container into the soil. You want the bottom half of it to be buried, so the finished product will look right.

Step 3 – Place Your Plants

Starting towards the opening of the smaller pot, place your succulents the same way you would make an upright arrangement. Get creative with the plant use and layout. Go with contrasting colors or various shades of the same. Laura wanted this to be an ode to Valentine’s Day and went with shades of pinks, yellows and light greens.

*Expert Tip: Dress up your soil with pebbles, mulch or even miniature succulents to disguise the soil and give it a more polished look.

Care Instructions

Take care of this arrangement the same way you would any other arrangement. If you used any cuttings, give it a week to allow them to heal before watering it in. When watering try to avoid watering the tops of the succulents – get as close to the soil as possible. Be mindful that in the winter, you may only need to water it every 10 to 14 days. While in the summer, you will be watering it once a week.

 

Find  the extended version here.