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Boost African Violets by Repotting

African violets need to be repotted about once a year to keep them growing big and beautiful. It is best to inspect them first to see if their leaves and roots are healthy.

If your African violet is happy and healthy, but needs room to grow or is fresh from the garden center and needs to come out of the plastic pot, transferring it, adding fresh soil and Espoma’s Violet! liquid fertilizer will keep it healthy and prevent it from getting leggy. Plus it will give you an opportunity to really interact with your new (or old) plants and give them some love.

houseplant care, potting soil, indoor plants

Steps to Repotting Your African Violets:

  1. Find the right container for your African violet. Keep in mind that the roots grow more out, not down – a shallow wide container will work better than a narrow tall container. Also, you want to find a slightly bigger container than the one it is now – never smaller.
  2. Fill the new pot with enough of Espoma’s Organic African Violet Potting Mix so the root ball will sit just under the lip. This will allow your plant to have the correct drainage, pH level and nutrients that it needs. African violets don’t like sitting in water, so keeping them in well drained soils will prevent root-rot.
  3. Take your African violet out of the previous pot by gently wrapping your hand around the plant and slowly removing it. Give the pot a squeeze or a small shake if the plant needs help coming out.
  4. Place your African violet centered in the new container. You want the root ball to be below the top of the container.
  5. Fill the container the rest of the way with soil and tuck it in the sides as needed. Be gentle as the leaves will break off if they are handled roughly.
  6. Water to settle the plant. The best way to do that is to soak the bottom of the pot in two inches of water and allow the roots to soak it up. Empty any remaining water after 5 minutes. African violets don’t like water to touch their leaves, so if you can’t soak it, be sure to water under their leaves and only the soil. Remember, the recommended amount  of our Violet! liquid fertilizer to the water to give it a boost.

Repotting or freshly potting your African violets will increase growth and beauty!

To see this done in action, watch Laura replant her African violets!

 

 

Why Do African Violets Get Leggy?

African violets are gorgeous flowering houseplants. They bring bright colors and joy indoors. Beginning and advanced gardeners can be successful at growing one.

They can be a little needy, as they have specific watering and light requirements. Because of this, African violets can sometimes get “leggy.” Leggy is when new growth forms on a plant tip. This new growth takes most of the energy away from the bottom of the plant.

 Reasons African Violets Get Leggy

Light

African violets require bright, indirect light, which can be achieved through grow lights or placing it near a thin curtained window. Gardeners sometimes think that indirect light means low light. Depriving your plant from light will cause longer stems as they reach for light to grow.

Water

Leaves of African violets don’t like to be wet.  The soil in your pot should be a well-draining soil to allow it to dry in between waterings. Be sure to water the soil, not the plant, in order to keep it happy. If leaves stay wet, they are more susceptible to mold, rot, and fungus growth. The flowers will try to get away from the mold or fungus and become leggy.

Age

African violets’ bottom leaves will turn yellow and eventually fall off the plant, leaving other stems bare.  This is a natural part of plant aging, plants lose the rosette of leaves at the base. This too can give the plant a leggy look.

The best way to combat leggy African violets is to repot to give it a fresh space and fertilize with Espoma’s Violet! liquid plant food. This will help keep your plant growing new leaves to help keep it from becoming leggy and will enhance the colors of your flowers.

 

Get six quick tips for caring for African violets from Garden Answer.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VCudo90K5I

 

A Healthy and Happy New Year with Plants

With the start of a new year, we’ve got resolutions on our mind. Eat right, exercise more and add houseplants.

Yep, you read that right. Houseplants actually boost your wellbeing. In addition to bringing the outdoors in, some houseplants are proven to provide both physical and psychological benefits.

You know that plants produce the oxygen we breathe, but did you know that houseplants are also powerful natural air filters. Common products such as household cleaners, carpets, furniture and nail polish release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

Add just few plants to your home to improve air quality. Adding houseplants is one of the easiest and least expensive ways to make your home healthier for the New Year.

Winter houseplants aren’t just limited to holiday plants like poinsettias. The options are endless.

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The Best Plants for Your Home

  • African violets
  • Orchids
  • Peace lily
  • Chinese evergreen
  • Philodendron
  • ZZ plant
  • Dieffenbachia

he colorful blooms of African violets are extra special. They’ll instantly add color to any room.

Some houseplants even remove common toxins from indoor air, surely shooing away the winter blues.

Other scientific studies show houseplants can help us stay healthier in other ways, including reducing frequency of headaches, sore throats and stress levels.

Especially after spending so much time indoors for the winter, it’s nice to have a pop of nature. Dry skin and chapped lips are uncomfortable side effects of forced-air heating. A natural remedy is to add houseplants that act as humidifiers, releasing moisture as a part of their natural breathing.

Being around plants, especially in indoor environments, improves creativity, problem-solving skills, memory, and cognitive skills.

While you’re at it, don’t forget to keep houseplants healthy! The cold season can be challenging for houseplants, too. Help houseplants thrive by creating a happy home and they’ll continue brightening winter days. Feed with Espoma’s indoor liquid plant foods to give plants the natural proteins and beneficial microbes they need. And the innovative Easy Dose cap pours the perfect amount without any measuring or mess.

Houseplants give back year-round. Learn more about caring for houseplants here.

How to Replant African Violets

Even African violets need to be repotted once to twice a year to keep them growing. Laura from Garden Answer guides you through the steps of choosing a new container and replanting.

6 Tips For Caring for African Violets

Laura from Garden Answer shows you how to care for African violets. Once you get in a regular routine of taking care of African violets, you’ll find they grow very easily. All of their basic needs need to be met though, or they won’t bloom. Give them the right temperature, light and a good feeding, and you’ll be blooming in no time!

 

6 Steps to Keep African Violets Blooming

The colorful blooms of African violets are extra special. They’ll instantly add color to any room.

They’re known to bloom continuously, even throughout the darker months of winter. Place them throughout the house to enjoy their colors and velvety texture throughout the year.

Once you get in a regular routine of taking care of African violets, you’ll find they grow very easily. All of their basic needs need to be met though, or they won’t bloom. Give them the right temperature, light and a good feeding, and you’ll be blooming in no time!

he colorful blooms of African violets are extra special. They’ll instantly add color to any room.

Choosing and Caring for African Violets:

1. Start off healthy. Choose a plant with bright emerald leaves and the flower color that you want. Make sure the pot has drainage holes.

2. The right light. The most common reason African violets don’t bloom is because they aren’t getting enough light. African violets need indirect sunlight, direct can burn the leaves. Choose a north- or east- facing window for best results. Keep plants away from cold glass and rotate the pot once a week so all leaves receive light. Extend daylight by placing African violets under a grow light during winter months.

3. Keep warm. African violets prefer the same temperatures most people find comfortable: between 70-80°F during the day, and around 65–70°F at night.

4. Water from below. Fill the saucer using room temperature water. Let sit for about an hour and then pour excess water out. Allow the plant to dry out between waterings.

5. Fertilize with Espoma’s new liquid Violet! Indoor houseplant food every 2-4 weeks in spring, summer and fall.

6. Think before replanting. African violets only bloom when they’re root bound. When it is time to repot, be sure to use an organic potting soil made specifically for African violets, such as Espoma’s African Violet Mix. They flower best in small pots — choose one that’s about a third of the diameter of their leaf spread.

Now that you’re African violet is off to a great start, it’s time to care for your other houseplants!    

7 Plants Cupid Struck with His Arrow

Roses are red. Violets are blue. All flowers are lovely, but let’s try something new!

Show your love with these seven indoor plants this year.

Tie a big, showy bow around the pot! Then seal the deal with a handwritten love note (complete with houseplant care instructions, of course).

Divine Gifts for Your Valentine: 7 Indoor Plants to Show Your Love

valentine orchid, houseplant care, potting soil, indoor plants

Opulent Orchids. Gift simple elegance to the one you love. Choose pink, purple or multi-colored and opt for a romantic colored pot, too. When repotting, use an organic orchid mix potting soil. Water with three ice cubes weekly, and fertilize monthly.

houseplant care, potting soil, indoor plants

Amorous African Violets. Dainty yet bold, African violets are for sweethearts who are sugar, spice and everything nice. Plant in a pot using potting soil specifically for African violets. Water only when dry to the touch, and feed weekly.

houseplant care, potting soil, indoor plants

Fiery Flamingo Flowers. Made for Valentine’s Day – complete with red, heart-shaped flowers! Water only when dry to the touch, and feed every 3-4 months.

houseplant care, potting soil, indoor plants

Captivating Cyclamen. Choose sweet pink or daring red flowers coupled with dreamy, marbled leaves to make your valentine swoon. Water when dry, and fertilize monthly when flowering.

houseplant care, potting soil, indoor plants

Mesmerizing Miniature Roses. Give pink or red roses for Valentine’s Day that last! During winter, keep soil slightly moist. Come spring and summer, feed every two weeks.

houseplant care, potting soil, indoor plants

Kindhearted Kalanchoe. These ever-lasting pink or red blooms flourish all on their own, making them perfect for brown-thumb Valentines. Water when dry, and fertilize once a month when flowering.

houseplant care, potting soil, indoor plants

“Be Mine” Bromeliad. Bold, bright and beautiful! Water the center of its bloom when the soil is dry.

 With indoor plants this good looking, your sweetheart is going to be head-over-heels in love!

Plant African Violets for a Pop of Color

Plant an African Violet in 9 Easy Steps:

Growing African violets is an easy way to add a burst of color inside – even in the dead of winter. These small flowers pack a punch with their bold color and dark, thick leaves.

To keep your African violet blooming all year long, follow these tips.

How to Pick, Plant and Care for African Violets:

  1. Pick the perfect plant. Select a healthy African violet in your choice of color that has dark green, spot-free leaves. Look for a plant with one growing center, known as a single crown, to get the most blooms.
  2. Start strong. Choose an organic potting soil made specifically for African violets, such as Espoma Organic African Violet Mix. A specially-formulated organic soil gives violets the right amount of air and drainage and is safe for people and pets, too.
  3. Choose a container. Use a pot made for azaleas or African violets, which has the right amount of drainage holes and a deep saucer. Avoid deep pots, which can cause roots to rot.
  4. Plant magic. Gently remove the African violet from its current pot without damaging roots. Next, give roots enough room to spread out. Pack any remaining holes with soil.
  5. Home sweet home. Place your African violet in a room-temperature spot with lots of indirect, natural light. Avoid direct sunlight, which can burn leaves. Be sure to rotate once a week for even growth.
  6. Water right. Only water your violet when the soil is dry to the touch. Then, fill the pot’s saucer, and allow the roots absorb the amount of water they need. After an hour, dump any remaining water to avoid over watering.
  7. Feed weekly. To keep your violet blooming and healthy, feed once a week with an organic plant food such as Espoma Gro-tone. This applies to all houseplants, too!
  8. Stop suckers. If you spot new growth, called suckers, on the main stem of your flower, remove them. Suckers can lead to misshapen plants.
  9. Repot. Repot large African violets once to twice a year and smaller ones twice per year. Choose a new pot that is 1/3 the diameter of the plant.

Enjoy the beautiful colors of your new African violets! Then, share your experience or why you love this purple flower today.