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Plants to Help You Get Some Rest

Houseplants are so much more than decorations. They help reduce stress and tension and create a relaxed and happy atmosphere. They absorb carbon dioxide and produce oxygen while purifying the air by removing toxins. They say we spend a third of our life sleeping, so let’s do it in the best possible environment, a room full of house plants.

The best plants for a healthy night’s sleep.   

Photo courtesy of Costa Farms

Snake Plant

Snake plants convert carbon dioxide to oxygen at night. It is also one of the easiest and most forgiving houseplants you can grow. Whether you have bright or low light, a snake plant will adjust to it. It doesn’t require much water and even if you forget to water it for a couple of weeks, it will still look great. Overwatering it is really the only way to kill it. 

Photo courtesy of Costa Farms

Golden Pothos

A study from NASA shows that pothos removes toxins, mainly carbon monoxide and formaldehyde from the air. This low-maintenance plant grows well in low light. Water it only when completely dry. Always pot your houseplants in quality potting soil like Espoma’s Potting Mix or a mixture of potting mix and Cactus Mix for plants like this that require excellent drainage. 

Photo courtesy of Costa Farms

Spider Plant

The spider plant removes formaldehyde from the air, which is a common carcinogen found in many household products and items. This is another easy to grow selection that enjoys bright light, but will adapt to low light situations. Like all house plants, a regular schedule of fertilizing will help keep spider plants in tip-top shape. Organic liquid fertilizer like Espoma’s Indoor! works beautifully and has an easy dose cap, meaning you’ll never use too much or too little.

Photo courtesy of Costa Farms

English Ivy

English ivy has the unique ability to clean the air of mold. Ivy is a trailing plant that you can train to grow up a trellis or let it cascade down from a shelf.  It can be an aggressive plant outdoors, but inside it’s well behaved. Keep the soil moist, but not wet, and give it a place with indirect light.

Photo courtesy of Costa Fams

Aloe vera

Aloe has been used as a medicinal plant to heal: sunburn, cuts, insect bites, minor burns, and dry skin. It’s also an air purifier. Aloe likes bright light. Water it well every two weeks or when the soil feels very dry. Fertilize with Cactus!  monthly to give it nutrients.

Photo courtesy of Costa Farms

Peace Lilies

Peace lilies also made it on NASA’s list of toxin removing plants. They can absorb mold spores from the air into their leaves. It’s a pretty plant with calla-like flowers that likes bright light. Regular watering is a must (they’ll let you know when they’re thirsty by letting their leaves droop.)

Lavender

Lavender has been used for centuries for its soothing, sleep-inducing properties. Victorian ladies used to stuff their pillows with lavender to relieve stress. Today you can find a wide array of lavender products to help whisk you off to sleep. Lavender isn’t often sold as a houseplant but you can grow it outdoors and harvest the flowers for the bedroom.

Ready for more relaxing? Check out these blogs for ideas.

Create a Spa in Your Bathroom

Top 5 Low Light Houseplants

How to Decorate for Thanksgiving with Plants

 

Dress up Your Desk with Succulents

Everyone likes to dress up their desks and it is fun to bring a little of the outdoors inside. Succulent arrangements can be chic or playful. Jurassic Park dish garden anyone? You may want to make one with a holiday theme by mixing in tiny holiday ornaments. Go hunting for unique containers.

Succulents are simple to grow with a little care and knowhow. They only need a small amount of water about every 10 days or so. . Good drainage is a must. Always use Cactus Mix, Cactus! soil.

A trick to find out if your plant needs water is stick a dry toothpick into the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot. If it comes out dry, it’s time to water. If there are bits of soil stuck to it, wait a few more days. It’s exactly like testing to see if a cake is done.

Always put them in the sunniest place possible. That can be tough in an office situation, unless you have that spacious, corner office. Happily, they’ll respond to that florescent light above your desk. LED light is fine too.

Photo courtesy of Costa Fams

Aloe

Plant several is one container to create a contemporary design. They would also be easy to combine with other succulents in a dish garden. Fertilize a few times in spring and summer to keep them happy. They grow 6 to 12 inches tall and wide.

Albuca

Albuca has a unique growing habit. It produces a thick bulb above ground. Thin grassy foliage rises from the bulb and blooms with green and white flowers. Try growing them with small succulents like Echeveria elegans. They grow 8 inches tall and wide.

Perle von Nurnberg Echeveria

Echeveria is a small succulent, just a few inches high. The overlapping leaves of this echeveria species are beautiful in color. A greyish brown base with light pink and purple highlights creates contrast between the leaves.  In the summer, the flowers can become coral to red with a yellow interior.

Kalanchoe

Kalanchoe is a beautiful succulent that can have colors of red, cream, and even yellow in its large, round leaves. No wonder they call them flapjack plants. One plant is all you’d need to create a show stopping display. It grows 1 to 2 feet tall.

 

Photo courtesy of Costa Farms

Haworthia

A big name for a small plant but the deep green leaves with white stripes really is a stand out. They look brilliant on small containers top dressed with a layer of five white gravel. They don’t like direct light so they work especially well in an office setting. They grow 2 to 8 inches tall and wide.

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